Welcome to Oklahoma

My aunt is visiting in a few weeks and I’m determined to plan a weekend that will forever dismiss her preconceived thoughts of a landlocked abyss. Although I'm an Oklahoman with roots stretching miles into the red dirt, my childhood memories occasionally linger to thoughts of playing in the rich top soil of the Indiana earth. I can relate. Pre-transplant I didn't have a clue what Oklahoma was - or who was there (here.)

In fifth grade, mere days from a 700 mile road trip to a home settled at the end of a dirt road, my class devoted an entire week to Oklahoma. Each student was given a topic and I was immersed in to the Oklahoma culture in a fast-paced fifth grader’s cliffs notes.

State Bird: Scissor-tailed flycatcher State Rock: Rose Rock State folk Dance: Square Dance State Flower: Indian Blanket

With the essentials in hand, we moved to Oklahoma where I drove (road shotgun) on my first dirt road. {It should be shared my teacher told me to watch out for cacti and copperheads - thanks, teacher, for the nightmares of moving to the desert...}

Yes, you read that correctly. I didn’t have a clue dirt roads existed. I lived in the country, road for hours in a combine, and used corn husks as grenades during fierce games of cops and robbers – but, I’d never seen a dirt road.

It’s incredible how in a relatively short amount of time I can not only call Oklahoma home but have a need to show others that there is more than dirt roads and wranglers. So let the planning begin! [I need your input]

Day 1 to-do list:

Head out of town on Route 66 stopping at Pops. A relatively new establishment is encompasses the attitude of many Oklahomans. Good people, good food, good time.

[Photo Source]

With hundreds of Soda Pop choices {is it coke, soda, or soda pop??} we might be here for hours...

Then we'll go north on 177 to a little town called Perkins - home of Pistol Pete and Brooke Clay!

Next stop, Stillwater. My aunt has been to Stillwater a few times; however, both revolved around a cap and gown, which didn't leave to much exploring. Although campus is beautiful, there is more to this one horse town than orange fountains. If I have it my way we'll eat cheese fries at Joes, buy a new pair of shoes at the Shoe Bank and take a gander at the new red dirt talent.

On our loop back to Oklahoma City, it's a necessity to make a stop in one of Oklahoma's most charming towns. Guthrie, Oklahoma's first capitol, intertwines small town romance with big city dreams. A pleathera of boutiques and tourist stops is sure to win over my aunt's Hoosier heart.

That's my rough-draft of day 1. What do you think? Anywhere else we should stop on the loop?